“I’m So Thirsty!”

The last few days, we had temperatures in the low to upper 80s. It got warm, and the high winds are not helping today. It sucks the moisture right out of my body. But not only I have to quench my thirst. My little friend, the Mourning Dove sat in a shady spot near the bird bath and relaxed from the warmer weather. Soon, the bird got thirsty, flew to the water and took some big gulps to stay hydrated. The Mourning Dove stuck around all afternoon. At least, there is plenty of food and water in our backyard.

North Texas Backyard Wildlife In February (5)

On a beautiful day like today, I sat on the porch to do some bird watching for myself. With the regular feathered friends, we also had some “Newcomers” in our backyard. Mr. & Mrs. Savannah-Sparrow came over to say ‘Hello’, before they moved on into the next yard.

Sandy decided to check the peanut slinky feeder. When she sat on the branch, she was only about five feet away from me. For a moment Sandy kept starring at me as she wanted to say: “Ma’am, the slinky feeder is empty. Could you refill it with those tasty peanuts? PLEEEEAAASSSEEE!” Unfortunately, I’m out of peanuts. I’d love to give her some. I guess, I need to go to the store and get some unsalted peanuts for the young lady and the Blue Jays, again. 😉

North Texas Backyard Wildlife In February (4)

Today, we had quite a few guests at in the trees and at the feeders. Everyone ate plenty of food to store more fats. Winter is not over, yet. Friday morning suppose to be in the mid 20s (-4°C). Here are today’s photos of our feathered and mammal friends:

Our Garden In Early February 2019

This afternoon, we’ve reached temperatures up to 80°F (27°C). It was perfect weather for doing some garden work, getting the raised beds cleaned up and planting my peas and early Spring flowers. While I pulled out weeds, I also found  a carrot that over-wintered in one of the raised beds. I might add it to a stew, later this week. Three Mourning Doves set on the trellis I put up for the peas, in the garden. They inspected my work, fertilized it, and enjoyed the view of the garden from the trellis, before Luis, our dog, chased them away.

North Texas Backyard Wildlife In January (10)

Katelynn had to stay home, yesterday. The darn tummy bug is going around in her school. And I must have caught it from her. This morning, I sat for some fresh air on the deck. In the meantime, I watched the birds and the squirrels get their meals. Even when I didn’t feel well, I still grabbed my camera and captured some photos of the Bewick’s Wren, a House Sparrow, and a Mourning Dove. It was gray-in-gray, due to overcast. But in the afternoon, the sky cleared up. And we had a blue sky with lots of sunshine.

The Mourning Doves Wait For Spring

We always have about half a dozen of Mourning Doves sitting in our Bradford Pear trees. They usually get accompanied with a couple of White-winged Doves. Mainly they sit there and wait until Lexi and Luis are done with their business and go back inside, so the doves can go back to the feeder. But the doves also enjoy snoozing in our trees, while they wait for Spring to arrive. It can take only a few days, until our Bradford Pear trees will break out in blooms. And this is usually a sign for the Mourning Doves that the mating season has begun. The trees will blossom and then the leaves come in shortly after the petals dropped to the grounds. The birds will have a sturdy hiding spot for building their nests in the tree crowns. Until then, they eat themselves fat and round at my bird feeders.

How Wildlife Stays Warm In Winter

This morning, I watched Mr. Squirrel climb down the tree. He sat on top of his empty critter feeder, kept his tail close to his body and tried to warm up in the Sun. He was debating, if he goes down to the food dish or stays to enjoy the sun rays a little bit longer. In the meantime Mr. and Mrs. Cardinal had a breakfast of peanut butter rolled in bird seeds with their friends, the House Sparrow and Gold Finch. A Mourning Dove sat on a tree branch and watched the critter and the songbirds from the distance. Later, a White-winged Dove joint the other dove in the tree. Both looked like puffed up balls in this cold weather. Each animal has it’s own way to stay warm, when it was only 14ºF this morning. One used it’s tail and the rays of the sun; some ate a warming meal of fatty peanut butter and seeds; and a couple more birds used their feathers to make air pockets. They know how to survive what Mother Nature throws at them.