November Native Blooms In Our Frontyard

Even with last night’s cold snap, the plants are holding up pretty well. I covered up my Meyer Lemon tree, just in case it gets too cool for it. Our native plant are doing fine and dandy.

Theona Checkerspot Butterfly (Chlosyne theona)

Theona Checkerspot (Chlosyne theona) on Asclepias Tuberosa Milkweed

The Colony Community Garden In Early October 2018

After over three months, I finally came back to the Community Garden. Christi took good care of the garden, while I was out due to sickness. But she had a lot of work to keep up with the six beds. After my tomato plants quit producing (we had a good harvest this Summer) and the tomatillos were a bust, she pulled them all out. Now, the pepper plants and the basil can breath, after all the weeds under the tomatoes are gone as well.

This afternoon I was in the garden, pulled some weeds and noticed a big fire ant hill in my front raised bed. Oh boy! I have to get rid of these ants first, before I can plug the weeds out in that area. Kevin, Sara and I went back over this evening. While Kevin was treating the ant hill, Sara and I looked at the plants and captured some photos in the garden.

πŸπŸ‚πŸƒΒ Happy Autumn Gardening!Β πŸƒπŸ‚πŸ

“New” Camera, More Adventures

For the last five years, my Nikon D5100 was my companion, when I was out and about around the US. We went on two Disney vacations, a trip to Washington, D.C., another trip to New York, so many 5K & Fun Runs, family adventures and gazillions of nature photos. But it also began to wear it out. And the last several months, I notice a decline in performance.

A couple of years ago, when I purchased a lens I considered to get a new body as well. I knew, I will need a new camera one day. I decided on the Nikon D3200. Back then, I couldn’t part with my older camera and still went on adventures with it. But today, I finally made the decision to sit the D5100 next to the D40 (my starter camera) in the shelf. And the D3200 will be my new companion from now on. May the “new” camera last me at least as long as the older one. πŸ™‚

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A Honey Bee and an Assassin Bug share the same milkweed. (Photo: Nikon D3200)

Why It Is So Important To Grow Milkweed In Our Yards

In recent years the Monarch population has declined drastically. Due to constructions, herbicides and environmental changes, it’s difficult for the Monarch butterfly to find milkweed. On its migration from Mexico to Canada (in Spring) and Canada to Mexico (in Autumn), this butterfly relies on this precious food resource. The Monarch lays its eggs on the milkweed. Once hatched, the caterpillars feed of the milkweed to get big, turn into pupa (chrysalis), before they become a butterflies.

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Monarch Butterfly on Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica)

If we don’t act fast, the Monarch migration could collapse within the next two decades. It is encouraged to plant more milkweed to protect the butterfly from going extinct.