The Lunar Eclipse of January 2018

It was a perfect morning with no cloud in the sky, temperatures in the mid 40s (7ºC); the Moon was still up and hadn’t set yet. If I hadn’t made the toilet my best friend last night, I would have gone to the field next to Sara’s school this morning. But I needed to stay close by my house. And so I decided to capture the show from my frontyard. Now thinking about it, it actually gives the photos more personal character. I can relate to it more, since I captured it from my own street. Sometimes certain moments work out for the best. 🙂


Next “Blue Moon”

I’ve just noticed, we will have no Full Moon in February. But therefore we will have a second Blue Moon in March for this year. It also depends, were you live on the planet, and at what time the Full Moon phases will be present, f.e. Far East Asia, Australia, etc. had no Blue Moon. Because their Full Moon phase was on February 1, 2018.

The Full Wolf Perigee Moon


The first Full Moon of 2018

Today we celebrate New Year and the first Full Moon of the year 2018. In January it is closest to Earth of this year. Luna will only be 221,559 miles (356,565 kilometers) from our planet at 8:24 pm CST (Central Standard Time in the US), tonight. On average, the moon is about 238,000 miles (382,900 km) from Earth. That’s why we call it a “Supermoon”. On January 31, 2018 we will have a Full Blue Moon, which will also be a “Supermoon”.

The December Full Perigee Moon


The December Full Moon is a Supermoon.

Technically the Moon won’t be full until 9:47 CST, tomorrow morning. But by that time Luna has set and won’t be visible for us in Texas.

It also will be a Supermoon (Lunar perigee) in the early morning hours of Monday, December 4. The distance between Earth and Moon will be 222135 miles (357,492 km), compared to the Lunar apogee distance of 252526 miles (406,401 km) in June 2017. This explains why the Moon looks so much bigger, when it rises in the December sky this year.

The December Full Moon before Yule (Winter Solstice) is also called Full Cold Moon or Long Nights Moon, because Winter sets in and the nights never seem to end.

The Late Hunter’s Full Moon

In 2017 the Hunter’s Full Moon rises in early November, due to the Harvest Moon was in early October and therefore closest to the Autumnal Equinox. Coincidental, it is the second largest Moon of this year. It will rise ride after sunset, and set at dawn.


Autumn branch silhouette in the Hunter’s Full Moon light. (11-03-2017)


Ha, what a lucky moment: I caught an airplane right in front of the Hunter’s Full Moon, before it landed in the Dallas Love Field Airport. (11-03-2017)

Harvest Full Moon 2017

Tonight, the Harvest Full Moon rises in the October night sky. Usually the Harvest Full Moon shines bright in the September sky. But this year, the October Moon is closer to the Autumn Equinox. The Hunter’s Full Moon will appear on November 4, 2017.

Here are a couple more photos, I’ve captured after I brought Sara to school this morning (10-06-2017). The Harvest Moon shined bright in the western skies. It was a beautiful sight.

August Full Moon ~ Sturgeon Moon

Sturgeon Moon, Green Corn Moon, Grain Moon, Red Moon

The grain ripens in the fields and the sturgeons become plentiful in the lakes. The Moon takes on a red hue from the Summer haze. It is the beginning of the harvest season and the time to begin preparing for Winter.

The August Full Moon is a time of balance between hope and fear. We have harvested some things but the remaining crops are still in limbo. We take the steps we can to ensure success in our lives while trusting that the universe will meet us halfway.