2019, In The Garden

The Blooming Peach Tree

Our peach tree looks so pretty, when the first blossoms open in Spring. I never can get enough of these beautiful little pinkish flowers. In February, I’ve pruned the tree  a little bit. But I still might have left too many twigs on the tree. Eventually, I’ll figure it out, how much is okay and what is too much. Last year, we had lots of peaches. But they were small. I’ve figured, not pruning it, would cause bearing small fruits. Now, I’ve gotten quite a bit of bloom on the tree, again. Let’s see, how the fruits will turn out. If they are still too small, I need to seek some advise from the local nursery. Since we’ve also had very hot days in the month of July, the tree might need more water last Summer. But I’d rather ask an expert, before I “drown” the tree.

2019, In The Garden

Gardening & Bird Watching

While I worked in the garden, Chewbacca hung out with me in the backyard. First, he ate some grass blades. And then he looked at the birds. There were so many too watch in the trees, in the bushes and on the fence. Chewbacca prowled on a couple of birds. But they were much faster. Sometimes, the birds startled him when the whole flock flew off into another tree. In the meantime, I planted my onion slips, rhubarb and strawberries. When I was done, with my garden work, Chewbacca was ready to come into the house. It was enough adventure for him in one day.

2018, In The Garden

It Is Peach Season

A few years back, Kevin and I planted a peach tree in our backyard. Luckily it was producing fruit in the same year. But back then, we had five peaches growing. And Mr. Squirrel had his own way of sharing: Four peaches for him, one for us as a family of four. I quartered the last peach, so we all could enjoy a little slice of fresh “heaven”.

The following year, we’ve got about a dozen peaches. And Mr. Squirrel was much more generous: He took his four peaches and left us with the eight remaining fruits.

This Spring, our peach tree was in full bloom. And we could tell, we would get tons of peaches this Summer. But I’ve noticed they are a little bit smaller this year. I wonder, if the drought has a big factor in it. The tree didn’t get as much water as in the previous years. And I might have to consider some fertilizer for the next season. So, while Mr. Squirrel, the Blue Jays, Mrs. Mockingbird and Mrs. Sparrow are happily munching away my peaches, I had to rescue some for ourselves. On Monday, I filled up a bowl. And when those fruits are gone, I have to grab some more from the tree. In the meantime, Luis keeps Mr. Squirrel in check. Mr. Squirrel is allowed everywhere on our property, but not on the peach tree. As soon as the Squirrel jumps in that tree, Luis is getting havoc. Once he gets outside, he chases the squirrel across the fence. “No, no! No peaches for you, Mr. Squirrel.”

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Fresh, homegrown peaches from our tree in the backyard
2018, In The Garden

Our Garden In Early May 2018

May has arrived, and finally we get warmer days and nights. The day temperatures are in the mid to upper 80s (28º-31ºC), while at night they are in the upper 50s to low 70s (15º-21ºC). This is perfect weather for our crop to grow in the raised beds. Kevin, the girls and I are excited that the peppers are getting bigger. The peach tree is heavy with fruits. And soon, we can harvest some Romaine Lettuce. I love dinners with fresh harvested salad from the backyard. Here are some photos I’ve captured from the raised bed garden, today.

2018, In The Garden

🌸Peach Blossoms🌸

Finally, the first flowers of my peach tree opened today. Shooting sharp photos of them was a little bit of a challenge. We have some pretty strong wind guest, which bring warmer temperatures into North Texas. I had to put my shutter speed and ISO higher, and lower the aperture to get decent images. After this weekend, the whole tree will be in bloom. Hmmm! By July we might have a tree full of ripe peaches. 🍑🌸 

2018, In The Garden

The Meyer Lemon Tree

A week before Valentine’s Day, Kevin (my husband) asked me what I would like as a present for this special day. Since I’m low maintenance, he always likes to ask me first, before he goes to a store and buys something ‘silly’. I said, I’d love to get a plant from him. A lavender, a rosemary, or anything what comes to his mind, when he visits a garden nursery. Valentine’s Day had approached, and Kevin walked with a Meyers Lemon Tree through the front door. It had lots of blossoms, and a lemon to show. And the fragrance was amazing.

Almost four weeks later, I seriously had to think about re-potting my new tree. It’s Spring and the right time to look for a new pot. I went to our local nursery, found the perfect pot, got some citrus-tree fertilizer; bought a couple of smaller pots to re-pot my lavender. And of course I had to get a Texas Bluebonnet. I couldn’t resist it. Back at home I filled the pot 1/4 with potting soil, pulled the lemon tree out of its old plastic pot to transfer it, and filled the rest of the new pot with soil. Now, the lemon tree roots are watered, fertilized, and have more room to stretch and grow. The bees have already discovered the tree and are very busy pollinating it. Hopefully we have more lemons, soon.

Originally posted on my old blog “A Garden Full of Memories” on March 11, 2015.

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Update today:

Unfortunately the first Meyer Lemon tree made it only through two seasons, before it died due to a hard freeze. Not even the greenhouse could protect it. We pruned it, and it didn’t really come back for a third season. This made me really sad.

Kevin and I were debating long and hard to get another Meyer Lemon tree. Because I really love the fragrance of its flowers. And when I  squeeze some drops of the lemons in my water, it is very refreshing and not as harsh on my tummy as the juice of  a regular lemon. We still were going back and forth with a new tree last year.

This February, Kevin asked me what I would like for Valentine’s Day. I replied: “Do you remember, when you got me that Meyer Lemon tree on Valentine’s Day three years ago?” “Yep, I remember it! I guess, it is time for a new tree”, he answered. Today, we went to the nursery and picked up a new Meyer Lemon tree. And this tree definitely won’t be in the greenhouse in Winter. It will have a cozy place inside our house until the weather is suitable enough to roll the tree outside, while it will get pollinated by bees and enjoys the warmth of the sun and the rain drops of Spring and Summer.

Here are some more photos of the first Meyer Lemon tree. For photos of the new tree the temperatures are cool and the lighting is not good enough, today. But I will post photos throughout the warmer seasons.

2017, In The Garden

Autumn Fruits And Vegetables In The Colony Church/Community Garden

This morning was cool enough to get some work done at the Community Garden. My bed desperately needed some clean up. The squash bugs got to my zucchini plant, and some of the flowers were just wilted from the heat of Summer. One of my sunflowers was ready to get harvested. And I needed to make some room for more Autumn/Winter vegetables.

After the clean-up and watering, Christi and Wally harvested quite a bit of okra for the food bank. I can see a delicious gumbo in the future. 😉 Meanwhile, I walked around and captured photos of both gardens. When it gets a little bit cooler here in North Texas, we all will be much busier building more raised beds, cleaning out the older raised beds and get the garden ready for the Autumn/Winter season. Here you can see what’s growing in the gardens right now:

2017

Fruits of Autumn

At this time of the year, it is so important to eat our fruits and vegetables to boost our immune system for Winter. Living in a suburb of two big Texan cities and getting in contact with lots people on a daily basis, our body gets challenged even more.

It is Autumn. Apples, grapes and pumpkins are in season, right now. Hmmm, I can also see apple cakes with caramel and pumpkin-cheesecakes in the near future. And not to forget the sweet smell of pumpkin spice will be in the air. Yummy!

2017, In The Garden

The Calamondin Orange Tree

Calamondin is a hybrid (citrofortunella) between a mandarin orange and a kumquat. Calamondin oranges are edible, but the tree is rather used as an ornamental.

Two years ago, Kevin got me a Meyer lemon tree for Valentine’s Day. Last Spring, I added another small Calamondin  orange tree to my citrus tree collection. It had some fruit hanging from its tree, when I purchased it. When they were ripe, we used them to flavor our ice water.

Since my little tree sat there and looked a little bit intimidated by the bigger cousin, the Meyer lemon tree, I decided to transfer it into a bigger pot and fertilized it. It started to bloom again. And the fragrance of those blossoms are so mesmerizing. It smells so good, so does its fruit.