Garden Lights

This Summer, my garden lights went out one after the other. Tonight I changed out the batteries. And everything looks like new again. Now, the little garden fairies can easier find their way back home. Sara and her friend from across the street like this very much.

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The Dragonfly garden light, which is in my fairy garden in the frontyard.

The Life Cycle of A Raindrop

The Adventures Of Randy The Raindrop

Randy the raindrop lived in a cloud.
The heat from the sun made him big, strong, and proud!
He got bigger and bigger until one day – Oh My!
He fell through the floor of his house in the sky!

Randy was scared, then he saw more raindrops falling.
“Hey Randy, isn’t this fun?” they were calling.
Then onto a leaf with a splash Randy fell,
And what happened next is a strange thing to tell.

Randy was made up of water, you know,
a part of him went to help the tree grow.
The rest of him went into a puddle so round,
then the sun came out and shone on the ground.

The sun warmed Randy and he started to change.
He became water vapor – My isn’t that strange?
Little drops of water, too tiny to see,
Floated into the sky – yes that was Randy!

Randy’s home once again was a cloud in the sky.
He was a raindrop once more, but then by and by …
The sun made him bigger and bigger and then …
He fell through the floor of his house once again!

by Patty Jean Wiese

Blooming Hyacinth Beans

After late Spring sowing, the Hyacinth Bean began to bloom in the Community Garden a few days, ago. They are so pretty! My Hyacinth Bean plants in my home garden seem to take a little bit longer. But they are not in the sun all day. And I was sowing them several days later. It all takes time and patience. Eventually mine will bloom, too.

Planting Seeds For The Texas Autumn/Winter Garden

Sara and I planted seeds for the Autumn/Winter garden, all afternoon. We used coconut shell-soil as seed starter. Sara helped putting the soil in every hexagon, and I stuck the seed in them. Everytime I used a different seed, I also gave one to her. She’s always fascinated, how different the seeds look like, before she plants them in her pots.

Now, we planted all kind of goodies: beans, corn, cucumbers, lettuces, squashes, sunflowers, etc. Autumn planting is so much more fun in Texas. The seeds have a warm start. And when it begins to get cooler, it’s easier to work outdoors again.

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Sara helps planting seeds for the Autumn/Winter garden.

Blooms In The Colony Community Garden

Over the last few months, the Community Garden had some yield for the local pantry. And the plants still keep growing. Soon, we’ll plant for the Autumn/Winter garden. When the temperatures go down, it will be more pleasant to do some yard work. But in the meantime, we planted some flower and melon seeds, which can handle the Texas heat much better. The sunflowers will also provide some well needed shade. And they will make good poles for the beans, later. Zinnias love this kind of weather. And the watermelons and cantaloupe have a good warm start to produce. Usually, we’ll harvest the fruits by mid-November.

Velvet Leaf/Indian Mallow

In one of my pots is a plant growing, which I couldn’t figure out what it is. After some research and asking someone online, I finally got my answer: It is a Velvet Leaf. I have seen these plants sitting in corn fields before. So I wonder if the wind or a critter had a part in it, that a seed ended up in my pot. I probably will never know.

Velvet Leaf is native to South Asia. In China, it is grown for is jute-like fiber. The leaves are used for cooking. And the seeds can be consumed as well. In the 18th century, it was introduced to North America. Since Velvet Leaf likes rich soils, it can be mostly found in crop fields. The Velvet Leaf became very invasive, and is one of the most detrimental weeds to corn causing decreases. So, what’s good on one continent might be not so great on another. I guess, I have to take care of the seed pods, before the seeds will drop and causing a stink in the long run. 😉