A Frontyard Visitor At Dusk

After sundown, we’ve got a not-every-day visit from a Yellow-crowned Night Heron. First it landed on the neighbor’s roof across the street; rested for a little bit; walked down to the gutter; to end up in the neighbor’s frontyard, before it crossed the street to end up strutting on our front lawn. Katelynn and Sara observed the bird for a little bit. When the heron had enough, it flew into another neighbor’s tree. By that time, it was too dark to make out the bird between the leaves. ~ Good night, little Yellow-crowned Night Heron! It was nice to meet you and come for a visit in our yard.

Mother’s Day 2019

🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹🌷🌹   

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Mother Duck with her sweet offspring

Happy Mother’s Day!

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Our Garden In Late April 2019

The warm and the rainy days help the garden to progress very quickly. Flora and Fauna are flourishing. Our Meyer Lemon tree has a lot of flower buds; and we have a first blossom. The tomatoes are growing fast. Planting them on a good layer of compost did the trick. The peach tree is full with fruits. I can’t wait for July to come, so I can harvest them.

A little Bewick’s Wren made its home in the nestbox outside of Katelynn’s window. She loves it, when the wren wakes her up with a beautiful song every morning. The Blue Jays are very pleased, how the raised beds come along. The birds did their part of growing the beds as well. Lots of seeds turned into seedlings. In Summer, they will enjoy a Sunflower “jungle”.

Happy Gardening!

“I’m So Thirsty!”

The last few days, we had temperatures in the low to upper 80s. It got warm, and the high winds are not helping today. It sucks the moisture right out of my body. But not only I have to quench my thirst. My little friend, the Mourning Dove sat in a shady spot near the bird bath and relaxed from the warmer weather. Soon, the bird got thirsty, flew to the water and took some big gulps to stay hydrated. The Mourning Dove stuck around all afternoon. At least, there is plenty of food and water in our backyard.

The Cedar Waxwings

Soon, the Cedar Waxwings will migrate to their breeding range up to the northern US and Canada. Right now, they still enjoy the weather in their Winter range down here in the southern US and Mexico. In the evening hours, they all come in big flocks, feast on some leftover berries from last Autumn and then move on to the next tree. I can easily tell, when the Cedars are sitting in one of my trees. Their calls are very high pitched. And these little birds can be very noisy, when they communicate with one another.