Planning For The Autumn Garden

Even when it is hot outside, I have to plan for my Autumn garden. Last week I’ve started sowing plants. And this week, we have some seedlings sprouting on the porch. I keep them in the shade for most of the day, because I don’t want the sun to torch them at that stage.

Happy Gardening!

The Colony Community Garden In Early March

Finally, I made it over to The Colony Community Garden. If it is not sickness in our house, it is the rain that kept me away for a few weeks.About three weeks ago, I cut off the broccoli heads. But I left the rest in my raised bed. When I came back, I found more broccoli grown to my surprise (I did that with the kale all year, and it worked as well). I guess, the rain and the cooler weather was the perfect “chemistry” for the broccoli to keep giving. Probably by next week, I can cut some more. The red cabbages formed tight balls. Now, they need to grow. Katie’s brussels sprouts get bigger and are almost ready for the harvest. Christi was sowing some root vegetables in Winter. In a few weeks, there is a good chance we can pull some radishes. The Church Garden is looking good, too. Onions, savoy cabbages, spinach and other Winter goodies are doing very well in their beds. I also had a big smile, when I saw theΒ Dianthus are coming back blooming in my bed. They like the warm days and cool nights. Everything looks so good. But we all can’t wait for warmer weather. We want to get the tomatoes, peppers, beans, etc. in the soil and grow some good vegetables for the local food pantry.

This year, my plans are: to get more herbs in the beds; I would like to concentrate only on a few vegetables, instead of many. And then rotate the crop. I hope to get a higher yield this way. I’ll keep you updated. πŸ™‚ In the meantime:

🐞🌷Happy Gardening, y’all! 🌷🐞

What’s Growing In My Garden This Winter?

With this crazy roller coaster weather we experience in North Texas, gardening can become quite a challenge. Last Autumn I planted some Winter cabbages. And the broccoli was the only plant that survived. In January, I started all over again. But I learned my lesson, and planted the vegetables in big pots. They spend the cooler days and nights inside the greenhouse. And on the warmer day, I can open the windows. The onions and the garlic do well in the raised beds. They don’t seem to mind that it is 70ΒΊF (22ΒΊC) one day, and 14ΒΊF (-10ΒΊC) on another day. Once the vegetables can be harvested, a portion will go to the food pantry as well.

“Screw It! I Will Keep Gardening Anyway!”

… was my thought this morning. The North Texas nights are around the freezing point. And during the day, we get mild temperatures of upper 60s to low 70s (20ΒΊC – 22ΒΊC). It supposed to get cooler by the end of the week. But I’m tired to wait for Spring. And by that time, I have to plant the Spring/Summer crop.

Over the last years, I gained quite a bit of knowledge in gardening. And I’m still learning a lot. What grows best, and what crop I should stay away from in our region. But I’m also very stubborn and try and try and try. Sometimes I outgrow the advises, and put pumpkins and squashes in the garden, anyway. I curse the squash vine borers. But if it wasn’t for that one or two pumpkins, I probably had given up already. πŸ˜€

The Texas roller coaster weather throws another challenge in my direction. Over the last few weeks, I lost some crop due to the daily temperature changes. I watched carefully, what survived in the Community Garden, the Church Garden and my own garden. I just keep adding to it. My family likes their cabbages and kale. And screw it! I will keep gardening, anyway!!!!” πŸ˜‰

Frost Resistant Plants In The Colony Community Garden

Christi and I were working in the Community Garden this morning. She was mulching in some leaves in her raised bed. And we planted some onions, together. Dave came over to join us and see how the garden is doing, after the freeze in the single digits earlier this week. The broccoli, brussels sprouts, kale, leek, onions, savoy cabbages, spinach, and white & red cabbages made it. That was an exciting sight. Something has survived. We still had to plug some dead plants out. But the work was not wasted time. ❀

Winter Blooms In My Greenhouse

Every Winter I plant some flowers in my greenhouse throughout Winter time. Their colorful blossoms always bring a great warming feeling on those grayish Winter days. Even when it snows outside, they are warm and cozy tucked in the soil inside the greenhouse.

Winter Vegetables In The Colony Community Garden

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One of our volunteer gardeners planted a bunch of cabbages and other Winter vegetables. When Kevin and I came to the Community Garden to check on things, he pointed out a cabbage head and the cauliflower in Katie’s raised bed. I’m so excited seeing the Winter crop growing and producing wonderful vegetables.

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